Vauxhall Astra K Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not many details, but here's the news article to start:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jul/23/nissan-refuses-government-request-on-qashqai-emissions

Specifically this paragraph:

Similarly, Vauxhall is to make free adjustments to all of the diesel Astras it has sold across the EU, including almost 14,000 sold in the UK.
I entered my reg into DVLA's car history checker at https://www.check-mot.service.gov.uk/ and it says:

Outstanding recall found
There's an outstanding manufacturer's safety recall on VAUXHALL ASTRA xxxxxxx. The vehicle has been recalled since at least 24 July 2019.

Contact a VAUXHALL dealership to arrange for repairs.

If you've had the recalled component repaired recently, it can take up to three weeks for the manufacturer to update their records.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Following up, here's the relevant page from the DVSA report:

Vauxhall Astra SRi CDTI

4.66 The testing results of the Astra raised concerns in terms of NOx.

4.67 Initial tests showed that the Astra failed the laboratory NEDC (cold and hot) tests. We arranged for a second vehicle to be tested to check that it wasn't an issue with that specific vehicle. Although the second vehicle passed the NEDC (cold) test, it did exhibit significantly increased NOx when running the NEDC (hot) test.

4.68 When we shared the results with Vauxhall they offered a number of possible explanations for the results, none of which were convincing.

4.69 We were surprised that NOx emissions had increased to more than twice the legislative limit when tested on the NEDC (hot) cycle in a condition where the vehicle would not know it was under test. This is a standard cycle in which the vehicle is not driven aggressively. WLTP (track) and RDE test results also showed high NOx. Vauxhall explained that they had not conducted a WLTP (track) cycle test for this vehicle so were unable to comment but they had carried out RDE tests and found similar results to MSU.

4.70 Vauxhall highlighted that the engines for these vehicles had been developed some time ago (2013/14) and were used in the previous generation Astra. Since that time, expectations have changed and all of their newer models contain an SCR system, rather than just LNT. Therefore, the high NOx on the RDE test could be expected from a vehicle which had no SCR system.

4.71 On the request of the manufacturer, the vehicle was retested. Vauxhall engineers inspected the vehicle and downloaded codes/data from the ECU. The preconditioning and DPF regeneration were both carried out the same day. The vehicle was tested the next day; NEDC (cold) followed by NEDC (hot).

4.72 Vauxhall shared with us that they are currently working with the German approval authority, KBA, to develop a recalibration of the emissions control system to improve emissions performance. Vauxhall expect the recalibrated software to reduce NOx emissions in the real world by about 50%.

4.73 Approval of the modification is still pending. Following approval, Vauxhall will apply the modification to all vehicles across Europe, including the 13,864 vehicles in the UK. Vauxhall will offer this upgrade to UK customers via direct mail. Vauxhall have informed us that the upgrade will be free of charge for customers and will take approximately 30 minutes.

4.74 It was agreed with Vauxhall that we will test a recalibrated vehicle to validate whether emissions in the real world are reduced. We expect to publish the results in the next report.
"LNT" and "SCR" explained:

Lean NOx Trap (LNT)

Unlike a petrol engine, a diesel engine's exhaust is 'lean' - a term meaning it has excess oxygen present. As a result, a standard catalyst cannot convert NOx emissions. A lean NOx trap is a device which looks similar to a standard catalyst, but which acts as a molecular sponge, chemically trapping NOx emissions (by adsorption) rather than converting them. The amount of NOxa trap can hold is dependent on its temperature. The optimum temperature window is typically around 250-450°C. However, once the trap is full, it can't adsorb any more NOx. The trap must therefore be periodically 'purged' by briefly creating 'rich' conditions (excess fuel) in the exhaust. When this happens the trap releases and simultaneously converts the NOx to nitrogen and water vapour. The frequency with which this happens will depend on the system and the driving conditions, but it is typically several times an hour.
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR)

SCR is an alternative catalyst system that is able to convert NOx even under 'lean' exhaust gas conditions. The reaction takes place with ammonia (typically supplied as AdBlue) in the presence of a catalyst, either oxides of base metals (such as vanadium, molybdenum and tungsten), zeolites, or various precious metals. To be efficient, the SCR must be at its nominal operating temperature (350-450 °C) and it can reduce NOx emissions by up to 95%. Critically, unlike the other systems described here, SCR relies on a consumable reagent (to provide the ammonia) and only reduces emissions whilst the catalyst is being supplied or "dosed" with this reagent. As a result, regulations require a visible and audible driver warning when reagent levels are low and that vehicle performance is restricted or engine restart is prevented if the driver fails to refill the system

The temperature of the SCR is determined primarily by the exhaust gas. Therefore, the placement of the SCR in relation to the engine and the engine's duty cycle are critical with respect to the SCR's performance. The SCR canister is relatively large. In addition to the SCR, the following are also required:

• AdBlue tank - the AdBlue dosing rate will vary by engine and vehicle but this tank will be sized to avoid vehicle owners having to refill too frequently. The tank also contains heaters and sensors.
• A dosing pump - to pump the AdBlue from the tank into the exhaust pipe just before the SCR.
• A control module - to control the amount of AdBlue added.
• Pre and post SCR NOx sensors - to ensure that the SCR system is operating correctly.

Although readily available, the main design constraint is the amount of space needed for the installation.
If the modification from Vauxhall only takes 30 minutes then that's going to be engine ECU firmware update, not AdBlue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,195 Posts
So basically, all the diesels that have been in or have to go in for the brake/clutch problem, now have to go in to have the firmware updated.

It seems like the old joke where a guy asks a friend, who has the new car the most of the time is answered with "The garage".

I wonder if they will be forced to retrofit AdBlue onto these cars to meet emissions standards.

The answer is that they are probably NOT going to be forced to do this, atleast not in the EU, as EU seems to be protecting their own car manufacturers from expensive recalls. (What VW was forced to do in the US, and the EU were vastly different.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,214 Posts
Don't think it's just vx cars with these emission problems , VW caught out big time and splattered all over the TV / internet vauxhall could get away with this quietly if they play their cards right. Maybe mentioned in a few car mags but that's about it.
But they are all up to it with these emissions scams , my son-in-law is an mot tester and and some stories he tells are nothing short of amazing. A lot of "smaller" manufacturers have recalled vehicles that's gone under the radar of everyone and have got away with it........just.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,195 Posts
Pompeydave said:
Don't think it's just vx cars with these emission problems , VW caught out big time and splattered all over the TV / internet vauxhall could get away with this quietly if they play their cards right. Maybe mentioned in a few car mags but that's about it.
But they are all up to it with these emissions scams , my son-in-law is an mot tester and and some stories he tells are nothing short of amazing. A lot of "smaller" manufacturers have recalled vehicles that's gone under the radar of everyone and have got away with it........just.
But if this is a recall that will hit the diesel's in the astra it will be a problem.

Why...Well the Astra came out in 2015 and the dieselgate scandal was uncovered in September 2015.

If Vauxhall has continued to produce cars, maybe even until today, with "cheat" software inside, that means that they continued cheating, even after dieselgate was uncovered.

If they changed the firmware to mitigate this, and put into newer MY's and it is only 2015/2016 models affected and they can prove that every car that has been in for a service, since 2016 has had the firmware upgraded, i would forgive them.

If they have not developed new firmware before 2019, and now have to have all of the cars in for a firmware update, i would argue that they have deliberately cheated, full well knowing this.

I wonder what, if any, effect this will have on fuel economy. Hopefully they wont degrade the MPG with this upgrade.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top